The new Artists with Machines brand story starts here.

The fact that this fabrication studio on the east side of Columbus, Ohio works with some of the most successful restaurant and retail brands in the U.S. is a pretty good brand story.

But staying on top in these brutally cost-conscious segments demanded nothing less than an amazing story.

A product story is not a brand story.

Despite a killer portfolio and a sterling reputation, Artists with Machines was losing out to importers who were attracting a new generation of buyers with mass-produced fixtures and architectural elements.

In most cases, Artists with Machines cost the same or less. However, their brand story focused on describing materials and technology, not illustrating value.

Building on a unique blend of artistry and efficiency.

Before writing the site content, I worked with CEO Rich Witherspoon to develop a unique selling proposition:

For the price of catalog fixtures, Artists with Machines can create architectural elements customized to the needs of the brand.

With the story framework in place, it was time to build the chapters.

The artists behind the machines.

I believe in the old maxim “write about what you know.” In fact, whenever possible, I like to tour the factory, so to speak, and not just to understand how things are made.

What I want is to meet the people who make the products, especially when those people are artists wielding large and potentially dangerous tools.

After half a day on the shop floor with the department leads, the company’s story began to unfold: uniquely skilled specialists making magic out of ordinary materials.

For example, the press operator who could make plastic look like etched glass.

Or the injection mold Michelangelo who cast the Frisch’s Big Boy icon. He wasn’t just operating a machine, he was conjuring up nostalgia out of liquid resin for the chain’s guests.

Given that level of access and inspiration, the story wrote itself. All I had to do was be there to capture the words.

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